krautkrapfa

Krautkrapfa is a noodle dish stuffed with sausage, bacon, and sauerkraut.  I wanted to try recreating this dish the first time I saw the picture.  I already had a jar of sauerkraut in the fridge too.  I’m not sure if I have ever had anything like it before though.

krautkrapfa filling

The first step was to decide how to make the filling.  I opted to include shiitake mushrooms and a Field Roast frankfurter in place of the meat.  Mostly because I already had them in the fridge.  I fried the mushrooms with some smoked sea salt, and then added the chopped field roast and apple kraut.  Given more time I probably would have thought of something else to use instead of the Field Roast.  However, it did add a nice flavor.krautkrapfa roll

Next I made a pasta dough, and rolled it out into a rectangular shape as thin as possible.  The filling was spread on the dough, and then the entire thing is rolled up.  The same way you make apple strudel!  Next, I made slices and placed them into a pan.

krautkrapfa panFinally, I poured veggie broth over the entire thing covered, and baked it.  The end result was amazingly delicious.  Well worth the time spent making it.  Next time I may change the filling to something a little healthier.

I served my krautkrapfa with steamed kale.  It was so good, Mr. EastHill Vegan gave it two thumbs up!

krautkrapfa plate

onion cake

Onion cake sounds a little weird, but it tastes rich, and creamy.  It is the perfect way to use a bunch of onions in early fall when they are harvested.  I should warn you, it will make your house smell like onions!  Onion cake is one of those things I remember buying in bakeries while visiting family in Germany.  I loved its rich, creamy, and smoky flavor.  It is somewhat similar to a quiche Lorraine, except instead of pie crust, and eggs, the onions are baked over yeast bread.  Traditionally, this recipe is not vegetarian as it usually contains bacon.  I have made this recipe a few times in the past with smoked almonds, which adds a nice crunchy texture.  This time, I decided the perfect substitute is really mushrooms!  As I have mentioned before I have been getting shiitake mushrooms from my CSA every week.  Most of the time I make shiitake bacon with them.  I use the recipe from the cookbook Isa Does It.  If you don’t have that cookbook you can find recipes here, or here.
onioncake

Recipe

  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 packet of dry yeast
  • 1 tbsp sugar
  • 1/2 cup Almond or soy milk
  • 2 tbsp water mixed with 2 cornstarch
  • salt
  • 2 lbs onions thinly sliced
  • 8 tbsp oil
  • 1 cup vegan sour cream (I used the Tofutti sour cream)
  • 1 tsp caraway seeds
  • 2 tsp paprika
  • freshly ground pepper

Directions

First make the shiitake bacon.  Instead of salt though I use one tablespoon of tamari, and I add two teaspoons of maple syrup.  To save time I made the them the night before.

Now make the yeast dough.  Sift the flour into a mixing bowl, and make an indent in the middle.  Add the yeast, and sugar into the center.  Warm the almond milk, and pour over the yeast. Carefully stir the yeast, and milk with a small amount of the flour.  Allow to rest for about 30 minutes.  Next add 3 tablespoons of oil, salt, and cornstarch mixture.  Knead the dough until smooth.  Cover with a damp cloth, and let the dough rest another 30 minutes, it should double in size.

In the meantime, thinly slice the onions.  In a large pan, saute with the rest of the oil until onions become glassy.  Remove from the heat, add sour cream, shiitake bacon, and spices.  Roll out the dough, and place into a greased casserole dish.  Bake for 45 minutes at 400 degrees until dough becomes golden brown.

mushroom cakes

chanterellesDuring my pre-vegan days I didn’t like mushrooms at all.  Actually, it was really about the texture, they are so weird and slimy.  I ate them occasionally if I didn’t really notice there presence.  After going vegan I slowly started to accept them into the “things I will eat”, group.  This summer we even joined a shiitake mushroom CSA!  When I first saw the recipe for Pfifferlings-Kuechle (chanterelle) in my cookbook, I thought I would love to try these.  The trouble is where can I get these special mushrooms?  As luck would have it a friend of mine, who discovered a trove of wild mushrooms near her home, happened to stop into the local co-op while I was there.  She was hoping to find someone that could identify, and confirm the mushrooms she found are in fact edible.  Personally, I am of the belief that if they are not in a store, and I am not being charged $9.00 a pound for them, they are probably poisonous.  My friend did find someone who could identify them as non poisonous, totally safe, edible chanterelle mushrooms.  In the past I would have said, no thank you when offered any wild mushrooms, but in the name of blogging I decided to take some home.  In the end I am glad I did, because they were wonderfully delicious!

If you are lucky enough to get your hands on chanterelles you might like to try this recipe for mushroom cakes.  We enjoyed them with fresh salad, and grilled eggplant, and zucchini.  The cakes came out perfectly, held together well, and tasted good.

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The original recipe does calls for 300 grams (about 10.6 ounces) of mushrooms, which I didn’t have.  I considered mixing them with shiitakes, but decided to halve my recipe instead.  This way I could experience the flavor of chanterelles on there own.  If you can’t get chanterelle mushrooms, try these cakes with a different variety, oyster mushrooms maybe?

Recipe

  • 2 cups (5 ounces) chanterelles thinly sliced
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped onion
  • 3 tbsp oil
  • 1/4 cup fresh, chopped parsley
  • 2 cups cubed bread (about 4 slices)
  • 1/4 cup soy milk
  • 1 tbsp. ground flax seeds mixed with 2 tbsp. of water
  • 1/2 tsp. flour
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 tsp nutmeg

 Directions

In a large pan saute the mushrooms, and onions with a tablespoon of oil.  Cook until the onions become transparent, and most of the liquid is gone.  Add the parsley, and remove the pan from the heat.  Heat the soy milk in a small saucepan, and pour over the bread.  Cover, and allow to rest for a few minutes.  Next, mix in the cooked mushrooms.  Then add the flax seed mixture, flour, salt, and nutmeg to the bread. Form six patties out of the bread mixture.  Using the same pan heat the oil, and fry the patties on both sides on medium heat, until they become golden brown. Enjoy!