krautkrapfa

Krautkrapfa is a noodle dish stuffed with sausage, bacon, and sauerkraut.  I wanted to try recreating this dish the first time I saw the picture.  I already had a jar of sauerkraut in the fridge too.  I’m not sure if I have ever had anything like it before though.

krautkrapfa filling

The first step was to decide how to make the filling.  I opted to include shiitake mushrooms and a Field Roast frankfurter in place of the meat.  Mostly because I already had them in the fridge.  I fried the mushrooms with some smoked sea salt, and then added the chopped field roast and apple kraut.  Given more time I probably would have thought of something else to use instead of the Field Roast.  However, it did add a nice flavor.krautkrapfa roll

Next I made a pasta dough, and rolled it out into a rectangular shape as thin as possible.  The filling was spread on the dough, and then the entire thing is rolled up.  The same way you make apple strudel!  Next, I made slices and placed them into a pan.

krautkrapfa panFinally, I poured veggie broth over the entire thing covered, and baked it.  The end result was amazingly delicious.  Well worth the time spent making it.  Next time I may change the filling to something a little healthier.

I served my krautkrapfa with steamed kale.  It was so good, Mr. EastHill Vegan gave it two thumbs up!

krautkrapfa plate

Spitzbuba holiday cookies

spitzbubaAccording to the cookbook Ive been using, no one really knows why these cookies are called spitzbuba. All the same I made them because I think almonds taste good in cookies. Also, its nice to have something sweet for a coffee break.  The recipe was very easy to veganize as well because the only non-vegan ingredient was butter.

Recipe

  • 3 cups flour
  • 1 cup ground almonds
  • 1 cup organic sugar
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • vegan butter
  • raspberry jam

Mix together the flour, ground almonds, vanilla, and sugar. Cut in the vegan butter with a pastry knife or fork. Form the dough into a ball and refrigerate for at 30 minutes. Preheat the oven to 375F. Line a backing sheet with baking paper. On a well floured surface roll out the dough and with a round cookie cutter form the cookies, and place on the prepared baking sheet. If the dough becomes to soft and sticky to work with place back in the refrigerator. Bake the cookies for 15 minutes until they become firm. While they are still warm assemble the cookies by spreading 1 teaspoon of jam on a cookie and top with a second. If desired sprinkle with sugar. Allow the cookies to cool completely.

potato noodles

20140915-145024.jpgI’m halfway through veganMoFo 2014!  Somehow I have managed to keep up with posting once everyday.  The temperature has been cooling down, and for the past two days we have had beautiful sunny weather.  I went out to a local farm stand this year to pick up some fall decorations.  We also brought home our first winter squash, and a pint of potatoes.  I am ready for the change in seasons, but I am not looking at all forward to what comes after autumn.

20140915-144953.jpgI made some delicious potato noodles with my potatoes.  Another recipe from my Swabian cookbook.  They tasted good, but in retrospect I should have made them a little skinner and longer.

Making them was easy to, although forming them did take some time. We had ours for breakfast with fruit, but they are great as a side with almost anything.

Recipe

  • 1 lb potatoes
  • 1 cup flour
  • mix 1 tablespoon of ground flaxseed 3 tablespoons of water
  • salt

Directions

Cook and peel the potatoes.  Mash until very smooth, or push them through a potato ricer.  Mix in the flour and salt, and flax seed mixture until a soft dough forms.  Form the noodles into zepplin shape.  Pan fry until golden brown.  Easy right?

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Ithaca gets a food truck

I have been having a very busy weekend, so this post is extra short. I have to say posting every day is a lot of work!

If you have ever visited Ithaca, NY you probably already know we don’t have many vegan food options. Many restaurants are vegan friendly, but none are 100% vegan. This weekend however a new entirely vegan food truck opened! It’s pretty exciting to be able to order food without asking a bunch of questions first.

My husband and I had a good time trying everything on their menu!

It’s called cafe Wild, named after the Where the Wild Things Are mural it sits next to.

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The food was pretty good, and I look forward to visiting again.

The food had a Mexican theme, I believe this is supposed to change periodically.

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rainy day lunch

Today is one of those chilly, grey and rainy autumn days here in Ithaca.  It is a common theme in upstate New York as summer ends. The perfect day to laze about the house, and to catch up on reading. With the cold and damp weather outside, I found myself wanting to make something warm and comforting for lunch. I flipped through my little cookbook and came across a recipe for sour brown lentils. It looked simple enough to make, and I already had everything I needed. I used canned brown lentils instead of dried, but the original recipe describes soaking and then cooking them in a separate pot.  I think using canned lentils made everything come together faster with canned, but it might taste better with dried.

saurelinsen

The best part about today being Saturday is that Mr. EastHill Vegan is home all day. Good excuse for making lunch together, not something we do often enough. While I was making the lentils, and Field Roast frankfurters, my S.O. steamed some cauliflower, and made a delicious pesto.  True to his style of cooking, he didn’t bother with chopping, but steamed the cauliflower as one piece.  The pesto is made with cashews, lemon juice and of course basil.  Everything went together wonderfully, and really hit the spot.  The lentils had a nice creamy texture, with a slightly tart flavor.

Recipe

  • 1 15oz can brown lentils or about 1 cup dried lentils, cooked in veggie broth.
  • 1 onion
  • 1 tbsp oil
  • 1 tbsp flour
  • 1 cup red wine
  • 3 tbsp red wine vinegar
  • 2 tsp liquid smoke
  • 2 tsp dried thyme
  • freshly ground pepper

Directions

Peel and finely chop the onion.  Saute the onion with a dash of salt until soft.  Sprinkle with flour and continue to cook until browned.  Add the wine, vinegar, liquid smoke, and lentils, simmer until most of the liquid is evaporated.  Season with thyme, pepper as desired.

himmel und erde (heaven and earth)

Last week I was happy to get pears, and potatoes among other things from my CSA.  I love the changing variety of produce during late summer  and early fall.  All the perfect of ingredients for delicious comfort foods.  As soon as I came home with my share, I knew I had to make another of my favorite fall dishes, ‘himmel und erde’ aka, heaven and earth.  Traditionally, this dish is a blend of potatoes from the earth, and sweet apples from the sky.  Normally it is topped with caramelized onions.There is debate as to which region of Germany this dish comes from, it may not even be from Southern Germany.  Actually, the recipe is not from my Swabian cookbook at all, its something I mostly make from memory.  I decided to have it for breakfast along with some of the Apple Maple Breakfast Sausage made by Field Roast, nectarines, and plums.  Himmel und erde is lighter with a touch of sweetness.

himmel&erde

Recipe

  • 1 pound yukon gold potatoes
  • 1 pound apples (or pears)
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 tbsp sugar

Directions

Cut the potatoes into cubes. Slice the apples, and remove the seeds. Cook the potatoes in simmering water covered, for about 10 minutes. Add the apples and sugar, allow it to cook for another 20 minutes. In the meantime fry 2 medium onions with salt until golden brown. Once the potatoes and apples are cooked mash until relatively smooth. Place it in a serving bowl, and top with the onions.

Spaghetti Eis (ice cream)

My favorite brand of vegan ice cream is probably Temptation by Chicago Vegan Foods.  They make so many amazing flavors; there hasn’t been even one I didn’t love.  Unfortunately, for me there are really only two places around here I can get this particular brand of ice cream.  The first place that carries this brand is Strong Hearts cafe, in the form of amazingly delicious milkshakes, that even non-vegans love.  They have many fantastic milkshake choices, but I usually get something with crushed Oreo cookies. I don’t go very often though, because they are located in Syracuse which is about an hour away.  The other place with Temptation ice cream is much closer to home at Purity Ice Cream.  They aren’t entirely vegan, and they don’t have that many flavors of Temptation.  They do however pack whatever flavor you want into pints so you can bring some home.

With our ‘day we metaversary’ coming I decided to make a special ice cream sundae, Spaghetti Eis!  This is something I used to find in many ice cream shops in Southern Germany. Actually, Germany is very creative in the ice cream sundae department. Maybe, they already have but, I think they need to get on board with vegan ice cream options.

So I sent Mr. EastHillVegan to Purity to pick up some Temptation vanilla Ice cream, while I made strawberry sauce with frozen berries from early summer.  I made this with my spaetzle maker, the strawberry sauce, and chopped cashews for the “cheese”. So yummy, probably way better than the original!

spaghetti ice

 

yeast dumplings and sauerkraut

I love, love, love, dumplings in just about any form.  These yeast dumplings are easy to make, and yummy. They came out just the way I remember. Moist on the outside, sort of dry and airy inside.  They really are quite delicious!

dumplingsMy Swabian cookbook suggests serving them on a bed of sauerkraut. The original recipe calls for cooking plain store bought sauerkraut with onions, sour apples, and some spices. I decided to purchase some delicious apple kraut from my local food co-op. apple kraut

Crooked Carrot is a great company that uses locally grown produce to make pickles, tomato sauce, and even salad dressing. They also have a CSA where you can buy pre-made meals. Sometimes they sell delicious vegan dishes during festivals.

Recipe

  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 packet of yeast
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 1/2 cup of almond milk at room temperature
  • 1 tbsp of flax meal mixed with 1 tbsp of water
  • 1/2 cup of oil
  • salt

Directions

Place flour in mixing bowl, and make an indent in the center.  Add yeast, sugar, and almond milk.  Mix yeast with a small amount of the flour.  Let rest for about 10 minutes.  Mix everything with the rest of the ingredients until a soft dough forms.  Cover and leave in a warm place for 30 minutes.  Bring a pot of salted water to a boil.  Knead the dough again until smooth.  Drop dough into boiling water by the teaspoonful.  Simmer for 15 minutes.

Gaisburger Marsch Stew

I wanted to post something earlier today, but today has been so very busy.  Specifically I was catching up with my Digital Libraries class.  I actually made this soup a few days ago, but I’m posting it now.  It’s not cheating if I made something a while ago right?

Anyway, Gaisburger Marsch is a typical meats and potatoes kind of stew that originated in Gaisburg, just outside of Stuttgart.  As I already had spaetzle it was easy to throw together.  Also, this weekend I got some potatoes from my CSA, so it was really perfect timing for this soup to happen. I wanted to use tofu in place of the meat because I felt it already had more than enough gluten.  Mr. EastHillVegan disagreed, and thought it would be better with seitan.  After some thought I decided on sundried tomato by Susie’s seitan.  Another great Ithaca made product.seitan

The stew is made with an onion, carrots, as well as the aforementioned spaetzle, potatoes, and seitan.  I seasoned it with a bay leaf, thyme, and pepper.

All in all it was flavorful and tasted pretty good. However, if I ever make it again I will make it with some baked tofu, as it was very gluteny.gaisburger

gluten-free breaded kohlrabi

Breaded kohlrabi and salad, it’s what’s for lunch!

breaded kohlrabi

Kohlrabi is a popular vegetable in Germany, or maybe just with my family.  I often eat it raw in salads, or as a stand in for cucumbers.  I have even made it a few times with falafel and vegan tzatziki sauce.

kohrabiThis recipe inspiration however, did not come from my cookbook, but from a German magazine filled with many recipes.  I no longer have the magazine so I made this dish up from memory.  I realized since starting vegan mofo, I have been consuming a lot of gluten, and thought this is a good place to take a break from flour.

Breaded kohlrabi is prepared the same way you might make breaded eggplant. It does not get very soft, and retains its crunchiness. I think it might be good as a casserole dish with cashew sauce perhaps.  Alternatively, you could try it with red sauce, or even keep it simple as I did, and enjoy it with salad and hummus.  I have also eaten these in a sandwich with tartar sauce, tomatoes, and lettuce.

What are some of your ideas?

Recipe

I used one large kohlrabi I received from my CSA.  This recipe will work just as well with the smaller versions too.  Peel and slice the kohlrabi into quarter inch pieces. You could also them into fries instead. Salt the slices, and arrange on a plate. Let them sit for about an hour, and then dry with a paper towel.

In the meantime, prepare the breading in a food processor.

  • 1 cup of GF cornflakes
  • 1 cup GF rolled oats
  • 2 teaspoons paprika
  • 1 tsp. thyme
  • 1 tsp. sage
  • Pepper

In wide, shallow dish mix 2 tbsp. of arrowroot powder, and 3 tbsp. of water. Dredge the kohlrabi slices in the arrowroot mixture and then coat with the ground cornflakes, and rolled oats. You can either bake or fry the kohlrabi slices, until golden brown.